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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 22-23 Table of Contents     

Lack of analgesic activity of petroleum ether extract of Bauhinia racemosa Lam in rats and mice


1 Department of Pharmacognosy, Manipal College Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, India

Date of Web Publication20-Sep-2010

Correspondence Address:
K S Chandrashekar
Department of Pharmacognosy, Nitte Gulabi Shetty Memorial Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-9234.68871

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   Abstract 

Objective: The effect of petroleum ether extract of Bauhinia racemosa was investigated in rats and mice to evaluate the analgesic activity. Materials and Methods: Acetic acid induced writhing model and hot plate method were employed to test the analgesic activity. Results: The results indicated that the petroleum ether extract had no significant analgesic activity. Conclusion: It may be inferred that Bauhinia racemosa do not have analgesic activity and the results are not in agreement with its traditional use.

Keywords: Analgesic activity, Bauhinia racemosa Lam, mice, rats


How to cite this article:
Chandrashekar K S, Prasanna K S. Lack of analgesic activity of petroleum ether extract of Bauhinia racemosa Lam in rats and mice. J Pharm Negative Results 2010;1:22-3

How to cite this URL:
Chandrashekar K S, Prasanna K S. Lack of analgesic activity of petroleum ether extract of Bauhinia racemosa Lam in rats and mice. J Pharm Negative Results [serial online] 2010 [cited 2019 Sep 23];1:22-3. Available from: http://www.pnrjournal.com/text.asp?2010/1/1/22/68871


   Introduction Top


The plant Bauhinia racemosa Lam (Fabaceae) is the most widely cultivated variety of the genus Bauhinia and is distributed in the sub-Himalayan ranges of India, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Arabia and southwestern Africa. Kirtikar and Basu reported the use of stem bark of B. racemosa in all kinds of pain, as a good vesicent, expectorant, stimulant and abortifacient. [1] The decoction of the root bark is used as a stimulant, analgesic and diuretic. The pods are edible, seeds are useful as purgative, antipyretic, cure eye diseases, head complaints and are used in venereal affections.

A flavone glycoside has been reported from the ethyl acetate extract of stem bark of B. racemosa.[2] This study was undertaken to screen the analgesic activity of the stem bark of B. racemosa in rats and mice.


   Materials and Methods Top


The stem bark of B. racemosa were collected from the local areas of Mangalore district, Karnataka, India, during December 2007 and were authenticated by Prof. Gopalakrishna Bhat, Department of Botany, Poorna Prajna College, Udupi.

Preparation of extracts

The powdered plant material (500 g) was successively extracted with petroleum ether in a soxhlet apparatus. The liquid extracts were concentrated separately and dried under vacuum. The dried extracts were preserved in a desiccator until further use.

Animals

Healthy Wistar albino rats of either sex weighing about 150-250 g and healthy albino mice of either sex and approximately of the same age and weighing about 20-25 g were used for the study. They were fed with standard chow diet (Pranav Agro Industries Ltd., Sangli, and Maharashtra, India) ad libitum. They were housed in polypropylene cages maintained under standard condition (12 hour light12 hour dark cycle; 25 ± 3 o C, 35-60% humidity). The experimental protocol was subjected to the scrutiny of the Institutional Animal Ethical Committee and was cleared by the same before starting.

The acute toxicity studies of ethyl acetate extracts were carried out according to OECD guidelines. Exactly 300 mg/kg dose of both the extracts administered orally was found to be nontoxic in mice and was taken for the further study.

Analgesic activity

The petroleum ether extract was evaluated for its analgesic activity by acetic acid induced writhing model [3],[4] and hot plate method. [5] In acetic acid induced writhing method, albino mice (20-25 g) were divided into three groups, each consisting of six animals. One group served as negative control (received 5% gum acacia 5 ml/kg), the second group served as positive control (received aspirin 50 mg/kg), while the third group received petroleum ether extract of B. racemosa (400 mg/kg body weight) orally. The writhing movements were observed and counted for 30 minutes after acetic acid administration.

In the hot plate method, albino rats (125-150 g) were divided into three groups with six animals in each group. One group served as a negative control (received 5% gum acacia 5 ml/kg), the second group received Pentazocin (5 mg/kg), while the third group received petroleum ether extract of B. racemosa (400 mg/kg) orally. The basal time was noted before and 1, 2, 3 hours after the administration of the drugs.

Statistical analysis

Results, expressed as mean ± SE, were evaluated by unpaired student t test. Values of P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.


   Results and Discussion Top


In acetic acid induced writhing test, B. racemosa (400 mg/kg; potency) has not reduced writhing count significantly [Table 1]. In hot plate method petroleum ether extract of B. racemosa (400 mg/kg) didn't show any significant increase in reaction time at 2 and 3 hours in compare to reference drug Pentazocin (P < 0.05) [Table 2].
Table 1 : Petroleum ether extract of B. racemosa on acetic acid induced writhing in mice

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Table 2 : Effect of petroleum ether extract of B. racemosa on thermic stimulus induced pain (hot plate test) in rats

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The analgesic activity of B. racemosa was studied for its central and peripheral activities. [6] Prostaglandins and bradykinin were suggested to play an important role in the pain process. No therapeutically active constituent has been isolated from the petroleum ether extract of this plant so far. It is likely that B. racemosa might not suppress the formation of these substances or antagonize the action of these substances and therefore in this study, B. racemosa (400 mg/kg) did not significantly increase the reaction time in hot plate test.


   Acknowledgment Top


The authors are thankful to Nitte Education Trust, Mangalore, Karnataka, India, for providing the necessary facility.

 
   References Top

1.Kirtikar KR, Basu BD. Indian Medicinal Plants. 1 st ed, Vol. 3. Dehradun: International Book Distributor; 1980. p. 676.  Back to cited text no. 1      
2.Boralli F, lizzo AA. The plant kingdom as a source of anti-ulcer remedies. Phytother Res 2000;14:581-91.  Back to cited text no. 2      
3.Koster R. Acetic acid induced analgesic screening. Fed Proc 1958;18:412-4.  Back to cited text no. 3      
4.Siegmund E, Cadmus R, Lu G. A method for evaluating for both non narcotic and narcotic analgesic. Pro Soc Exp Bio Med 1997;95:729.  Back to cited text no. 4      
5.Eddy NB, Leimbach B. Synthetic analgesics II: Dithienylbutenyl and dithiennylbutyl-amines. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1953;107:385-93.  Back to cited text no. 5      
6.Dray A, Perkin M. Bradykinin and anti-inflammatory pain. Trends Neurosci 1993;16:99-104.  Back to cited text no. 6      



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

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