Advertisment ACS-IndiaSymposium
 
Journal of Pharmaceutical Negative Results
  Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
 Home | About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current issue | Archives | Submit article | Instructions | Subscribe | Contacts  
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 5-12

Treatment with N-acetylcysteine does not alter blood glucose levels and the oxidative stress status in diabetic rats


1 Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP; Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
2 Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
André Valle de Bairros
Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Laboratory of Toxicological Analysis (LAT), B 13B - FCF/USP, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes, 580, 05508-000 - São Paulo, SP
Brazil
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq), Fund to support research in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (FAPERGS)., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-9234.116755

Rights and Permissions

Objectives: To verify the contribution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) as an antioxidant drug in the therapy of diabetes, helping to reduce the deleterious effects resulting from oxidative stress associated with the hyperglycemic state. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into normal (saline, 25 mg/kg NAC, and 75 mg/kg NAC) and diabetic rats (saline, 25 mg/kg NAC, and 75 mg/kg NAC) with five rats per group, and were treated or four weeks. Diabetes induction was performed by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan after fasting for 12 hours. Subsequently, glucose solution was used to promote wear of the pancreatic beta cells. Blood parameters such as glucose, glycated hemoglobin, hepatic and renal biomarkers, and butyrylcholinesterase activity were determined by commercial kits. Catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities were measured using spectrophotometric techniques, while glutathione and malondialdehyde levels were determined by chromatographic techniques. Results: NAC had no significant differences on glycemic, hepatic, renal, and oxidative stress biomarkers. Superoxide dismutase activity was significantly higher ( P < 0.05) in diabetic rats treated with NAC compared to the diabetic saline group, while butyrylcholinesterase activity was significantly lower ( P < 0.05) in the same groups. There was a negative correlation between superoxide dismutase and butyrylcholinesterase activities. Conclusion: NAC supplementation did not re-establish the antioxidant system and consequently the deleterious effects of diabetes did not decrease. Diabetic groups that received NAC demonstrated that superoxide dismutase activity was indirectly linked to the levels of butyrylcholinesterase. More studies are necessary to investigate the action of NAC on superoxide dismutase and butyrylcholinesterase activities in the diabetic state.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6221    
    Printed275    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded1913    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal